Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey Recipe

This Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey Recipe may sound a little different, but I think you will be surprised at the delicious results. Time and time again this turkey recipe and method has proved to be a real winner and has become the easiest part of a meal.

This Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey Recipe may sound a little different, but I think you may be surprised at the delicious results. Time and time again this turkey recipe and method has proved to be a real winner and has become the easiest part of a meal.

Over the years, we’ve cooked turkey every which of way, roasted and basted, and basted, and basted with all kinds of combinations of ingredients, roasted in a bag, fried (of course), we’ve brined and have gone brine-less. Honestly, I’m no expert, but I will say this, less is best in my book. Less messing. Less stuff. Less time.

This recipe I’m sharing with you today for a Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey definitely calls for less. It’s pretty straightforward. And no, it doesn’t taste like mayonnaise. This is just one of the methods we use, but after great results each time, moist turkey, that tastes like turkey, hands-down, it’s our preferred way so far.

Before I get to the mayo method, let’s talk turkey.

Tips for Cooking Turkey:

  • Bigger isn’t always better. A large turkey doesn’t equal large taste. So if you have a big group to feed, I’d recommend getting two smaller turkeys. Smaller turkeys (I’d say 12-13 lbs) are harder to come by, but look for them. Hunt them down.
  • No additional “stuff.” You may need to call around to find a turkey without all the junkity-junk, but it’s worth it. You may pay more per pound, but you won’t be paying for all that extra plumping or whatever it is. A good rule of thumb someone once told me is no more than 4 ingredients on the packaging. Remember, less is best.
  • Use a meat thermometer and cook for proper time. Turkey doesn’t need to take 4 hours to cook. I promise. Make sure you have a good meat thermometer that stays in the turkey and can be monitored from outside the oven. We like to insert the meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh (without touching bone) for monitoring while cooking, but you’ll also want to check the thickest part of the breast before removing from oven, so an externally monitored internal meat thermometer is handy. Whatever meat thermometer(s) you use, just be sure to test them ahead of the big day for accuracy.
  • Cook temperature and time for roasting a turkey is basic and simple. Roast high for a short time, then turn down until the internal temperature reaches 165-degrees F. See recipe below for temperatures, etcetera. You’ll be surprised how quickly it reaches the proper internal temperature, depending on size, 2 hours or less!
  • Let it rest. That turkey has been working and it’s hot man. Let it rest, covered, for at least 20-30 minutes (depending on size) before carving. It will help retain the juices and all the goodness. The internal temperature will continue to rise as it rests as well.
  • To brine or not to brine? If you like to brine and you’ve got the time, brine away… brine until you dine, in the sunshine, it’ll be fine. We’ve brined and we’ve gone brine-less. Honestly, I tend to be bad at planning, so I usually forget until it’s past the prime time to brine. Plus, I think when you invest in a good turkey, as mentioned before, with no additives or plumped up with extras, not too large, and roasted correctly, you might find that brining may not be all that necessary.
  • And finally, practice. Cook turkey more than just during the holidays. Try out different techniques. Brine, don’t brine. Test different basting combos. Feeling confident about cooking your turkey will help make the day of celebrating more enjoyable for you. And tasty too!

Okay, now for the Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey. I know, it sounds weird, but like I said before, it does deliver a moist and tasty bird. And, it’s simple. Let me show you. Mix herbs (fresh or dried) with mayonnaise. We used herbs we had on hand from the garden. Feel free to experiment with different herb and seasoning combinations. And of course, dried herbs may be substituted. Use the 1/3 dried versus fresh rule. Dried herbs are more potent.

Mayo Turkey

Chopped celery, and onion, salt, pepper, and a stick of butter for good measure, round out the ingredients needed, other than the bird.

Mayo Turkey

Prep the turkey in a roasting pan. Make sure it’s thawed y’all, I’ve made that mistake before. Rub the mayo/herb mixture all over and inside of the turkey. Season with salt and pepper, add the celery, onion, inside and out, and tuck the butter in the cavity.

how to roast turkey

Roast in a 450-degree F oven for 30 minutes. Turn the oven down to 350-degrees F, and insert the meat thermometer at this point in the thickest part of the thigh. Be careful to not touch bone. Some say insert it into the thickest part of the breast, we’ve done that too, but now use the thigh as the measure and then check the breast to make sure it reads the proper temperature as well before removing from oven.

Continue roasting, uncovered, until internal thermometer reaches 165-degrees F. If you’re concerned with the legs getting dried out, cover them partway through cooking with foil. Sometimes I do, this time I didn’t. Keep an eye on it during cooking to see if it’s needed.

This Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey Recipe may sound a little different, but I think you may be surprised at the delicious results. Time and time again this turkey recipe and method has proved to be a real winner and has become the easiest part of a meal.

Let it rest and carve.

This Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey Recipe may sound a little different, but I think you may be surprised at the delicious results. Time and time again this turkey recipe and method has proved to be a real winner and has become the easiest part of a meal. how to cook turkey turkey and gravy

Now enjoy with your favorite side dishes and of course gravy!

Speaking of gravy, save those drippings in the roasting pan. You’ll need those for the gravy. Turkey needs a friend. This Turkey Gravy Recipe will show you how easy it is to make your own gravy.

Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
This recipe I'm sharing with you today for a Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey definitely calls for less. It's pretty straightforward. And no, it doesn't taste like mayonnaise. This is just one of the methods we use, but after great results each time, moist turkey, that tastes like turkey, hand-down, it's our preferred way so far.
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Ingredients
  • 12-14 lb. whole turkey, (totally thawed, tee-totally thawed)
  • 6-7 fresh sage leaves, rough chopped
  • 5-6 fresh thyme stems
  • 2-3 springs of rosemary
  • 2-3 springs of oregano
  • 1½ cups of mayonnaise
  • 1-2 tablespoons coarse salt
  • 1-2 tablespoons pepper
  • 3 stalks celery, rough chopped
  • 1 large onion, rough chopped
  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter, salted
  • (adjusts all seasonings & mayonnaise as needed for size of bird)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450-degrees F.
  2. Lay turkey in a roasting pan.
  3. Remove leaves from herbs stems. Add sage, thyme, rosemary, and oregano to mayonnaise; combine well. Rub mayonnaise/herb mixture all over outside and interior of bird.
  4. Liberally salt, and pepper turkey. Add the celery, and onion, inside and out, and tuck the butter in the cavity.
  5. Roast turkey in 450-degrees F oven for 30 minutes. Then turn the oven down to 350-degrees F, and insert the meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh, being careful not to touch bone. Continue roasting, uncovered, until internal thermometer reaches 165-degrees F. Cover legs with foil partway through roasting if desired. Depending on size of turkey, total cook time will be around 1½-2 hours. Once the thermometer reaches 165-degrees F in the thigh, check the internal temperature of the thickest part of the breast to make sure it reads at least 165-degrees F as well.
  6. Remove from oven. Cover loosely with foil and let rest for at least 20-30 minutes (depending on size) before carving.
  7. Remember to reserve turkey drippings and juices for gravy.

This post was originally posted on November 8, 2011, and updated a republished on November, 22, 2014.